Impact of donor time to cardiac arrest in lung donation after circulatory death

Robert Qaqish, Yui Watanabe, Konrad Hoetzenecker, Jon Yeung, Manyin Chen, Andrew Pierre, Kazuhiro Yasufuku, Laura Donahoe, Marc de Perrot, Tom Waddell, Shaf Keshavjee, Marcelo Cypel

研究成果: Article査読

3 被引用数 (Scopus)

抄録

Objective: Acceptance of lungs from donation after circulatory determination of death has been generally restricted to donors who have cardiac arrest within 60 minutes after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies. We aimed to determine the effect of the interval between withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies to arrest and recipient outcomes. Second, we aimed to compare outcomes between donation after circulatory determination of death transplants and donation after neurologic determination of death transplants. Methods: A single-center, retrospective review was performed analyzing the clinical outcomes of transplant recipients who received donation after circulatory determination of death lungs and those who received donation after neurologic determination of death lungs. Donation after circulatory determination of death cases were then grouped on the basis of the interval between withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies and asystole: 0 to 19 minutes (rapid), 20 to 59 minutes (intermediate), and more than 60 minutes (long). Recipient outcomes from each of these groups were compared. Results: A total of 180 cases of donation after circulatory determination of death and 1088 cases of donation after neurologic determination of death were reviewed between 2007 and 2017. There were no significant differences in the 2 groups in terms of age, gender, recipient diagnosis, and type of transplant (bilateral vs single). Ex vivo lung perfusion was used in 118 of 180 (65.6%) donation after circulatory determination of death cases and 149 of 1088 (13.7%) donation after neurologic determination of death cases before transplantation. The median survivals of recipients who received donation after circulatory determination of death lungs versus donation after neurologic determination of death lungs were 8.0 and 6.9 years, respectively. Time between withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies and asystole was available for 148 of 180 donors (82.2%) from the donation after circulatory determination of death group. Mean and median time from withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies to asystole were 28.6 minutes and 16 minutes, respectively. Twenty donors required more than 60 minutes to experience cardiac arrest, with the longest duration being 154 minutes before asystole was recorded. Recipients of donation after circulatory determination of death lungs who had cardiac arrest at 0 to 19 minutes (90 donors), 20 to 59 minutes (38 donors), and more than 60 minutes (20 donors) did not demonstrate any significant differences in terms of short- and long-term survivals, primary graft dysfunction 2 and 3, intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation days, or total hospital stay. Conclusions: Short- and long-term outcomes in recipients who received donation after neurologic determination of death versus donation after circulatory determination of death lungs are similar. Different withdrawals of life-sustaining therapies to arrest intervals were not associated with recipient outcomes. The maximum acceptable duration of this interval has yet to be established.

本文言語English
ページ(範囲)1546-1555.e1
ジャーナルJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
161
4
DOI
出版ステータスPublished - 2021 4
外部発表はい

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • 外科
  • 呼吸器内科
  • 循環器および心血管医学

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