Who gains resources from which social capital? A mathematical review

Shiro Horiuchi, Yusuke Kanazawa, Takahisa Suzuki, Hiroki Takikawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reviews the relationship between bonding and bridging social capital and the relationship between individual and collective resources obtained from the social capital. Bonding social capital likely appears if individuals are embedded in a dense network. Since all individuals usually share common resources from the bonding social capital, they should maintain the dense network. Accordingly, it is possible to keep individual and collective resources from the bonding social capital for a long time. If multiple dense networks of individuals are bridged by loose networks, bridging social capital likely appears. Individuals at "structural holes" can gain beneficial resources from the bridging social capital, whereas others embedded only in a dense network far from a structural hole gain few resources. If all individuals pursue structural holes for benefits, the bridging social capital likely disappears. Accordingly, if individuals behave following rational choice theory, it will be difficult for them to keep individual and collective resources from the bridging social capital for long. Some mathematical studies can clarify the complex relationships between bonding and bridging social capital and individual and collective resources. We review these mathematical studies and discuss how the collective resources from bridging social capital can be maintained with additive factors on individuals or all individuals as a whole, even if the individuals behave following rational choice theory.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Capital
Subtitle of host publicationTheory, Measurement and Outcomes
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages1-27
Number of pages27
ISBN (Print)9781624178221
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 1

Keywords

  • Agent based model
  • Bonding and bridging
  • Social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Horiuchi, S., Kanazawa, Y., Suzuki, T., & Takikawa, H. (2013). Who gains resources from which social capital? A mathematical review. In Social Capital: Theory, Measurement and Outcomes (pp. 1-27). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..