Visual texture agnosia in humans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visual object recognition requires the processing of both geometric and surface properties. Patients with occipital lesions may have visual agnosia, which is impairment in the recognition and identification of visually presented objects primarily through their geometric features. An analogous condition involving the failure to recognize an object by its texture may exist, which can be called visual texture agnosia. Here we present two cases with visual texture agnosia. Case 1 had left homonymous hemianopia and right upper quadrantanopia, along with achromatopsia, prosopagnosia, and texture agnosia, because of damage to his left ventromedial occipitotemporal cortex and right lateral occipito-temporo-parietal cortex due to multiple cerebral embolisms. Although he showed difficulty matching and naming textures of real materials, he could readily name visually presented objects by their contours. Case 2 had right lower quadrantanopia, along with impairment in stereopsis and recognition of texture in 2D images, because of subcortical hemorrhage in the left occipitotemporal region. He failed to recognize shapes based on texture information, whereas shape recognition based on contours was well preserved. Our findings, along with those of three reported cases with texture agnosia, indicate that there are separate channels for processing texture, color, and geometric features, and that the regions around the left collateral sulcus are crucial for texture processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-709
Number of pages9
JournalBrain and Nerve
Volume67
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Collateral sulcus
  • Occipital lobe
  • Texture
  • Ventral visual pathway
  • Visual agnosia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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