Viscosity and density of poly(ethylene glycol) and its solution with carbon dioxide at 353.2 K and 373.2 K at pressures up to 15 MPa

Masayuki Iguchi, Yuya Hiraga, Kazuhiro Kasuya, Taku Michael Aida, Masaru Watanabe, Yoshiyuki Sato, Richard Lee Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few viscosity and density data have been reported for CO2-poly(ethylene glycol) solutions, even though many vapor-liquid equilibrium data exist in the literature. In this work, viscosity and density of pure poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, M = 3000, 8300, 20,000 g mol-1) at atmospheric pressure were measured. Viscosities of PEG 3000 and PEG 8300 solutions with CO2 were measured with a torsional vibrating viscometer at 353.2 K and 373.2 K over the range of CO2 pressures from 5 MPa to 15 MPa. The densities of CO2-PEG solutions were calculated with the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory equation of state. From shear viscosity measurements, PEG 3000 and PEG 8300 were confirmed to be Newtonian and PEG 20000 was confirmed to be non-Newtonian. The viscosity reduction ratio for PEG solutions saturated with CO2 was found to be independent of the PEG molecular weight (400 ≤ M ≤ 8300 g mol-1). A simple equation is proposed that can correlate CO2-PEG solution viscosity reduction ratio to within 0.08 in absolute units. The CO2-PEG solution viscosities could be correlated with free volume models to within 14% using the fitted value of CO2 occupied volume.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Supercritical Fluids
Volume97
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Feb

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Density
  • Free volume viscosity model
  • Molecular weight
  • Poly(ethylene glycol)
  • Viscosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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