Usefulness of lesion image mapping with multidetector-row helical computed tomography using a dedicated skin marker in breast-conserving surgery

Narumi Harada-Shoji, Takayuki Yamada, Takanori Ishida, Masakazu Amari, Akihiko Suzuki, Takuya Moriya, Noriaki Ohuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) with skin-marker placement in determining the excision area and decreasing the positive or close margin rates in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MDCT) mapping images were reconstructed in subjects (n = 117) diagnosed with primary breast cancer who had undergone MDCT using CT skin markers. Serial 5-mm-thick slices prepared from the surgical specimen were used for pathological analyses. A "positive margin" was defined as the presence of malignant cells at the surgical margin, and a "close margin" as a tumor within 5 mm of the surgical margin. The rates of positive and close margins were calculated. We identified the lesions in 111 of 117 cases (94.9%) on MDCT. Of these, 93 underwent BCS under the guidance of MDCT mapping and the remaining 18 underwent mastectomy. Among the 93 cases, 6 (6.5%) had positive or close margins and were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ of low nuclear grade. MDCT mapping with a CT skin marker is feasible for simulating surgical positioning and determining the excision area. MDCT mapping could decrease the positive and close margin rates in BCS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)868-874
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Radiology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Breast-conserving surgery
  • Imaging
  • Multidetector-row helical computed tomography
  • Tumor extension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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