Underwater rock drilling by CO2 laser

Toshio Kobayashi, Kiyonobu Otani, Kazuyoshi Takayama, Satoru Umezu, Komei Okatsu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

As part of a fundamental study of rock drilling by laser irradiation, this paper describes the evolution of a cavitation cone created by pulsed CO2 (carbon dioxide) laser irradiation in water. A granite specimen submerged 50mm below the water surface was intermittently irradiated by a CO2 laser beam. High-speed video observations revealed the generation of an initial cone-shaped water cavity, propagation of the laser beam through the cavity and eventual ablation of the granite surface. The laser beam locally melts the granite surface to form small glassy beads, which are readily removable by mechanical methods. Repetition of this procedure demonstrated that a high-power laser beam propagating in water can be used to create a hole in rocks. This paper reports on the observed process by which molten granite is formed into small glass particles in the water.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication26th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics, ICALEO 2007 - Congress Proceedings
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1
Event26th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics, ICALEO 2007 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: 2007 Oct 292007 Nov 1

Publication series

Name26th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics, ICALEO 2007 - Congress Proceedings

Other

Other26th International Congress on Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics, ICALEO 2007
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period07/10/2907/11/1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

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