Ultraviolet-B sensitivities in Japanese lowland rice cultivars: Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase activity and gene mutation

Mika Teranishi, Yutaka Iwamatsu, Jun Hidema, Tadashi Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a cultivar difference in the response to ultraviolet-B (UVB: 280-320 nm) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Among Japanese lowland rice cultivars, Sasanishiki, a leading Japanese rice cultivar, is resistant to the damaging effects of UVB while Norin 1, a close relative, is less resistant. We found previously that Norin 1 was deficient in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photorepair ability and suggested that the UVB sensitivity in rice depends largely on CPD photorepair ability. In order to verify that suggestion, we examined the correlation between UVB sensitivity and CPD photolyase activity in 17 rice cultivars of progenitors and relatives in breeding of UV-resistant Sasanishiki and UV-sensitive Norin 1. The amino acid at position 126 of the deduced amino acid sequence of CPD photolyase in cultivars including such as Norin 1 was found to be arginine, the CPD photolyase activities of which were lower. The amino acid at that position in cultivars including such as Sasanishiki was glutamine. Furthermore, cultivars more resistant to UVB were found to exhibit higher photolyase activities than less resistant cultivars. These results emphasize that single amino acid alteration from glutamine to arginine leads to a deficit of CPD photolyase activity and that CPD photolyase activity is one of the main factors determining UVB sensitivity in rice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1848-1856
Number of pages9
JournalPlant and Cell Physiology
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec

Keywords

  • CPD photolyase
  • Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)
  • Gene mutation
  • Rice (oryza sative L.)
  • UVB radiation
  • UVB sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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