Ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging of knee joints in normal and osteoarthritis rats

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder and estimated to cause symptoms in 20-40% of the elderly population. 532 nm laser is much absorbed in developed vascular network in the spongy bone which is one of the main characteristics of OA. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with 532 nm laser and 50 MHz US (ultrasound) transducer was developed. Normal and OA knee joints were observed by US and PA imaging. PA signal from the spongy bone was strong where US reflection was very weak. PA signal from the spongy bone was significantly strong in OA compared with that in normal knee while US showed similar low intensity echo in normal and OA. Detailed structure and information on vascular density of spongy bone in rat knee joint were successfully obtained with US / PA combined imaging. US / PA imaging should be useful for early diagnosis of OA.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
Pages1116-1119
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 31
Event2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: 2013 Jul 32013 Jul 7

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period13/7/313/7/7

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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