Transition temperature to crystal phase of Al86Mn14 quasicrystal ultrafine particles determined by direct observation and characterization of surface oxide layer

Osamu Kido, Hitoshi Suzuki, Yuki Kimura, Takeshi Sato, Yoshio Saito, Chihiro Kaito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Al-Mn quasicrystal ultrafine particles can be produced by the advanced gas evaporation method (AGEM), which is a method of preparing ultrafine alloy particles by coalescence growth among the particles near the evaporation sources. We investigated the phase transition temperature from a quasicrystal to a stable crystal, by examining successive electron diffraction patterns of an ultrafine particle in an in situ experiment using a transmission electron microscope. In spite of the report that the Al86Mn14 quasicrystal transforms into the crystal phase at around 400-670 °C on thin film specimens, the quasicrystal ultrafine particle transformed at 800 °C, i.e., the quasicrystal ultrafine particle is more stable. Since the cross-sectional view of the surface oxide layer of the quasicrystal ultrafine particles can be easily observed, the surface oxides of n-Al2O 3 and MnO were characterized as a result of the oxidation of residual atoms on the surface of the produced alloy particles including the quasicrystals. The conditions required for Al-Mn quasicrystal ultrafine particle formation by the AGEM can be estimated under the cooling rate of 105K/s.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-624
Number of pages6
JournalPhysica E: Low-Dimensional Systems and Nanostructures
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Natural oxide layer
  • Phase transition
  • Quasicrystal
  • Ultrafine particle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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