Towards a comparative framework of adaptive planning and anticipatory action regimes in Chile, Japan, and the US: An exploration of multiple contexts informing tsunami risk-based planning and relocation

Naoko Kuriyama, Elizabeth Maly, Jorge León, Daniel Abramson, Lan T. Nguyen, Ann Bostrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Coastal regions around the Pacific Ring of Fire share the risk of massive earthquakes and tsunamis. Along with their own political-economic, cultural and bio-physical contexts, each region has their own history and experiences of tsunami disasters. Coastal areas of Washington State in the U.S. are currently at risk of experiencing a tsunami following a massive Magnitude 9 (M9) earthquake anticipated in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ). Looking ahead to consider adaptive planning in advance of a tsunami following this M9 event, this paper explores how lessons from recent megaquake-and tsunami-related experiences of risk-based planning and relocation in coastal areas of Japan and Chile could inform anticipatory action in coastal Washington State. Based on a comparison of earthquake and tsunami hazards, social factors, and the roles of government, this paper outlines a framework to compare policy contexts of tsunami risk-based planning and relocation in three Ring of Fire coun-tries, including factors shaping the possible transfer of approaches between them. Findings suggest some aspects of comparative significance and commonalities shared across coastal communities in the three countries and at the same time highlight numerous differ-ences in governance and policies related to planning and relocation. Although there are limitations to the transferability of lessons in disaster adaptive planning and anticipatory action from one national/regional context to another, we believe there is much more that Washington and the Pacific Northwest can learn from Japanese and Chilean experiences. In any context, risk reduction policies and actions need to garner political support in order to be implemented. Additional case study research and detailed analysis is still needed to understand specific lessons that may be applied to detailed risk-based planning and relocation programs across these different national contexts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)878-889
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Disaster Research
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Disaster governance
  • Earthquake
  • Residential relocation
  • Risk-based planning
  • Tsunami

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

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