Topographic, electrochemical, and optical images captured using standing approach mode scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy

Yasufumi Takahashi, Yu Hirano, Tomoyuki Yasukawa, Hitoshi Shiku, Hiroshi Yamada, Tomokazu Matsue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We developed a high-resolution scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) for the characterization of various biological materials. Electrode probes were fabricated by Ti/Pt sputtering followed by parylene C-vapor deposition polymerization on the pulled optical fiber or glass capillary. The effective electrode radius estimated from the cyclic voltammogram of ferrocyanide was found to be 35 nm. The optical aperture size was less than 170 nm, which was confirmed from the cross section of the near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) image of the quantum dot (QD) particles with diameters in the range of 10-15 nm. The feedback mechanism controlling the probe-sample distance was improved by vertically moving the probe by 0.1 -3 μm to reduce the damage to the samples. This feedback mode, defined as "standing approach (STA) mode" (Yamada, H.; Fukumoto, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Koike, T. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 1785-1790), has allowed the simultaneous electrochemical and topographic imaging of the axons and cell body of a single PC12 cell under physiological conditions for the first time. STA-mode feedback imaging functions better than tip-sample regulation by the conventionally available AFM. For example, polystyrene beads (diameter ∼ 6 μm) was imaged using the STA-mode SECM, whereas imaging was not possible using a conventional AFM instrument.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10299-10306
Number of pages8
JournalLangmuir
Volume22
Issue number25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 5

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

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