Thermodynamic effect on cavitation performances and cavitation instabilities in an inducer

Kengo Kikuta, Yoshiki Yoshida, Mitsuo Watanabe, Tomoyuki Hashimoto, Katsuji Nagaura, Katsuhide Ohira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on the length of the tip cavitation as an indication of cavitation, we focused on the effect of thermodynamics on cavitation performances and cavitation instabilities in an inducer. Comparison of the tip cavity length in liquid nitrogen (76 K and 80 K) as working fluid with that in cold water (296 K) allowed us to estimate the strength of the thermodynamic effect on the cavitations. The degree of thermodynamic effect was found to increase with an increase of the cavity length, particularly when the cavity length extended over the throat of the blade passage. In addition, cavitation instabilities occurred both in liquid nitrogen and in cold water when the cavity length increased. Subsynchronous rotating cavitation appeared both in liquid nitrogen and in cold water. In the experiment using liquid nitrogen, the temperature difference between 76 K and 80 K affected the range in which the subsynchronous rotating cavitation occurred. In contrast, deep cavitation surge appeared only in cold water at lower cavitation numbers. From these experimental results, it was concluded that when the cavity length extends over the throat, the thermodynamic effect also affects the cavitation instabilities as a "thermal damping" through the unsteady cavitation characteristics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1113021-1113028
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Fluids Engineering, Transactions of the ASME
Volume130
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Nov 1

Keywords

  • Cavitating inducer
  • Cavitation instability
  • Cavity length
  • Thermodynamic effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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