The Well-Developed Mucosal Immune Systems of Birds and Mammals Allow for Similar Approaches of Mucosal Vaccination in Both Types of Animals

Tomonori Nochi, Christine A. Jansen, Masaaki Toyomizu, Willem van Eden

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The mucosal immune system is a compartmentalized part of the immune system that provides local immunity in the mucosa of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and digestive tracts. It possesses secondary lymphoid tissues, which contain immune cells, such as T, B, and dendritic cells. Once the cells of the mucosal immune system are stimulated by luminal antigens, including microorganisms, they infiltrate into diffuse areas of mucosal tissues (e.g., respiratory mucosa and lamina propria of intestinal villi) and exhibit immune effector functions. Inducing the antigen-specific immune responses in mucosal tissues by mucosal vaccination would be an ideal strategy for not only humans, but also mammals and birds, to protect against infectious diseases occurring in mucosal tissues (e.g., pneumonia and diarrhea). Infectious diseases cause huge economic losses in agriculture, such as livestock and poultry industries. Since most infectious diseases occur in mucosal tissues, vaccines that are capable of inducing immune responses in mucosal tissues are in high need. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of mucosal immunity in mammals and birds, and recent progress in the development of mucosal vaccines.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number60
    JournalFrontiers in Nutrition
    Volume5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 12

    Keywords

    • birds
    • mammals
    • mucosal immune system
    • mucosal vaccine
    • nutritional supplementation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Food Science
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Nutrition and Dietetics

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