The systemic inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score as a prognostic factor in patients with acute heart failure

Shigeto Namiuchi, Tadashi Sugie, Kenya Saji, Toru Takii, Akira Suda, Atsushi Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims By combining C-reactive protein and serum albumin concentrations, the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) provides valuable predictions of prognosis in patients with cancer. Both systemic inflammatory response and malnutrition are also common in patients with heart failure. We evaluated the efficacy of the GPS for predicting the prognoses of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Methods We investigated 336 patients who were admitted with ADHF. The GPS (0, 1, and 2) was defined as follows: patients with both elevated C-reactive protein (>1.0mg/dl) and hypoalbuminemia (<3.5g/dl) were allocated a score of 2, patients with only one of these biochemical abnormalities were allocated a score of 1, and patients with neither of these abnormalities were allocated a score of 0. Results During the follow-up period (mean±SD: 504±471 days), 71 patients (21.1%) died. Relative to a GPS of 0, the hazard ratios for all-cause death were 3.40 (95% confidence interval 1.81-6.45) for a GPS of 2 and 1.97 (95% confidence interval 1.06-3.66) for a GPS of 1, as determined using adjusted Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Conclusions The GPS, which is based on systemic inflammation, is useful for predicting the prognoses of hospitalized patients with ADHF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-415
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Medicine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 6
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • albumin
  • C-reactive protein
  • inflammation
  • malnutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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