The role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in deception when remembering neutral and emotional events

Ayahito Ito, Nobuhito Abe, Toshikatsu Fujii, Aya Ueno, Yuta Koseki, Ryusaku Hashimoto, Shunji Mugikura, Shoki Takahashi, Etsuro Mori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of deception while remembering neutral events and emotional events. Before fMRI, subjects were presented with a series of neutral and emotional pictures and were asked to rate each picture for arousal. During fMRI, subjects were presented with the studied and nonstudied pictures and were asked to make an honest recognition judgment in response to half of the pictures and a dishonest response to the remaining half. We found that deception pertaining to the memory of neutral pictures was associated with increased activity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and the left orbitofrontal cortex. We also found that deception while remembering emotional pictures was associated with increased activity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. An overlapping activation between the two types of deception was found in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Our results indicate that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is associated with the executive aspects of deception, regardless of the emotional valence of memory content.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-128
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroscience Research
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb

Keywords

  • Deception
  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • Emotion
  • Executive function
  • Functional MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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