The relationship between neurosensory disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve and the lingual split pattern after sagittal split osteotomy

Gerardo Martinez–de la Cruz, Kensuke Yamauchi, Shizu Saito, Hikari Suzuki, Yoshihiro Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro Kataoka, Shinnosuke Nogami, Tetsu Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between neurosensory disturbance (NSD) and the different types of bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) lingual fracture created. Study Design: The study group consisted of 45 patients with mandibular deformities (90 sides; 14 males and 31 females). Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained preoperatively and 1 week postoperatively. All patients were divided into lingual fracture line groups on the basis of their postoperative scans. NSD was tested preoperatively and 1, 3, and 12 months postoperatively by using a sensory touch Semmes-Weinstein (SW) test and the 2-point discrimination (TPD) test. Results: Patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of their lingual fracture lines after mandibular BSSO; among the 45 patients, 39 sides (43.3%) had short-splits, and 51 sides (56.7%) had long-splits. The short-split group was less affected at all tested times, and the difference between the 2 groups was significant 1 month postoperatively on TPD test but not at other times on the both tests. Conclusions: The split type did not affect the NSD incidence at 3 and 12 months postoperatively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-378
Number of pages6
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology
Volume130
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Oct

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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