The observation of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays with an electron-tracking compton camera loaded on a balloon

Atsushi Takada, Hidetoshi Kubo, Hironobu Nishimura, Kazuki Ueno, Toru Tanimori, Kentaro Miuchi, Ken N.Ichi Tsuchiya, Sigeto Kabuki, Kaori Hattori, Shunsuke Kurosawa, Chihiro Ida, Satoru Iwaki, Naoki Nonaka, Eiichi Mizuta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As next-generation MeV gamma-ray telescope, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) that consists of a gaseous tracker and an absorber. The ETCC obtains the energy and direction of both a scattered gamma ray and a recoil electron, and determines both the energy and direction of an incident gamma ray, photon by photon. Furthermore, this camera features powerful background rejection based on Compton-scattering kinematics. To prepare for future spacecraft loading, we planned the balloon experiment, "Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment" (SMILE). As the first step in SMILE, we demonstrated gamma-ray detection using our camera by observing diffuse cosmic gamma rays and secondary gamma rays generated by collisions between high-energy cosmic rays and nuclei in the air. On September 1, 2006, our detector was loaded on a balloon and launched from Sanriku Balloon Center, ISAS/JAXA. The balloon realized level flight at an altitude of about 35 km during a live time of 3.0 h. We succeeded in obtaining about 420 downward gamma-ray events in the 0.1-1 MeV band in the field of view of 3 str, and derived the fluxes of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-164
Number of pages4
Journaljournal of the physical society of japan
Volume78
Issue numberSUPPL. A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Balloon
  • Compton camera
  • Mev gamma ray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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