The modified high-density survival assay is the useful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiation exposure

Yoshikazu Kuwahara, Miyuki Mori, Toshiyuki Oikawa, Tsutomu Shimura, Yosuke Ohtake, Shiro Mori, Yasuhito Ohkubo, Manabu Fukumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high-density survival (HDS) assay was originally elaborated to assess cancer cell responses to therapeutic agents under the influence of intercellular communication. Here, we simplified the original HDS assay and studied its applicability for the detection of cellular radioresistance. We have recently defined clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells, which continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2 gray (Gy) of X-rays for more than 30 days in vitro. We established human CRR cell lines, HepG2-8960-R from HepG2, and SAS-R1 and-R2 from SAS, respectively. In an attempt to apply the HDS assay to detect radioresistance with clinical relevance, we simplified the original HDS assay by scoring the total number of surviving cells after exposure to X-rays. The modified HDS assay successfully detected radioresistance with clinical relevance. The modified HDS assay detected CRR phenotype, which is not always detectable by clonogenic assay. Therefore, we believe that the modified HDS assay presented in this study is a powerful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy against malignant tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-302
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of radiation research
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Clinically relevant radioresistance
  • Clonogenic assay
  • Ionizing radiation
  • MTT assay
  • Modified high-density survival assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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