The John Prince Research Forest: Evolution of a co-management partnership in northern British Columbia

Sue Grainger, Erin Sherry, Gail Fondahl

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The John Prince Research Forest (JPRF) was established as a co-managed forest between Tl'azt'en Nation and the University of Northern British Columbia, as an opportunity for these partners to blend their respective ways of understanding and managing forests to contribute to ecological and social sustainability. Using four criteria of successful co-management reported in the literature as critical to the early stages of partnership - partnership building, institutional structure, decision-making, and capacity - we discuss the JPRF's performance during the first half-decade of its existence. The JPRF's early experience provides an example of the evolution of a co-management relationship that, while facing constraints and challenges in regard to some of the criteria, has provided the foundation for a strong future partnership.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)484-495
    Number of pages12
    JournalForestry Chronicle
    Volume82
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jan 1

    Keywords

    • Aboriginal
    • British Columbia
    • Co-management
    • Community forestry
    • Criteria and indicators (C&I)
    • First Nation
    • Forest management
    • Forest tenure
    • Joint venture
    • Partnerships
    • Research forest
    • Tl'azt'en Nation
    • Traditional environmental knowledge

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Forestry

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