The impact of inspiratory pressure on stroke volume variation and the evaluation of indexing stroke volume variation to inspiratory pressure under various preload conditions in experimental animals

Yu Kawazoe, Tsuyoshi Nakashima, Toshie Iseri, Chiaki Yonetani, Kentaro Ueda, Yuka Fujimoto, Seiya Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Stroke volume variation (SVV) measures fluid responsiveness, enabling optimal fluid management under positive pressure ventilation. We aimed to investigate the effect of peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) on SVV under various preload conditions in experimental animals and to ascertain whether SVV indexed to PIP decreases the effect. Methods: Mild and moderate hemorrhage models were created in nine anesthetized, mechanically ventilated beagle dogs by sequentially removing 10 and then an additional 10 ml/kg of blood, respectively. In all the animals, PIP was incrementally increased by 4 cmH2O, from 5 to 21 cmH2O. SVV was measured by arterial pulse contour analysis. Stroke volume was derived using a thermodilution method, and central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure were also measured. Results: SVV increased according to PIP with significant correlation at baseline, with mild hemorrhage and moderate hemorrhage. PIP regression coefficients at baseline and in the mild and moderate hemorrhage models were 0.59, 0.86, and 1.4, respectively. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that PIP and the degree of hemorrhage had a significant interaction effect on SVV (p = 0.0016). SVV indexed to PIP reflected the hemorrhage status regardless of PIP changes ≥9 cmH2O. Conclusions: PIP is significantly correlated with SVV, even under hypovolemia, and the effect is enhanced with decreasing preload volumes. Compared with SVV, the indexed SVV was less susceptible to higher inspiratory pressures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-521
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Anesthesia
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 22
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Fluid responsiveness
  • Inspiratory pressure
  • Preload
  • Stroke volume
  • Tidal volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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