The effects of visual complexity for Japanese kanji processing with high and low frequencies

Katsuo Tamaoka, Sachiko Kiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of visual complexity for kanji processing by selecting target kanji from different stroke ranges of visually simple (2-6 strokes), medium (8-12 strokes), and complex (14-20 strokes) kanji with high and low frequencies. A kanji lexical decision task in Experiment 1 and a kanji naming task in Experiment 2 were administered to native Japanese speakers. Results of both experiments showed that visual complexity inhibited the processing of low-frequency kanji, whereas such consistent, inhibitory effects of visual complexity were not observed in the processing of high-frequency kanji. Kanji with medium complexity were processed faster than simple and complex kanji in high frequency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-223
Number of pages19
JournalReading and Writing
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 13th stroke boundary
  • Japanese kanji
  • Kanji frequency
  • Strokes
  • Visual complexity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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