The effect of combination therapy with interferon and cryofiltration on mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis originating from mixed cryoglobulinemia in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

Hideyasu Kiyomoto, Hirofumi Hitomi, Youko Hosotani, Mayuko Hashimoto, Kouichi Uchida, Kazutaka Kurokouchi, Masami Nagai, Norihiro Takahashi, Megumu Fukunaga, Katsufumi Mizushige, Horohide Matsuo, Shigekazu Yuasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cryofiltration, which has developed from double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) with a cooling unit, is an on-line technique to remove cryoglobulin. We report on a patient who suffered from progressive edema and renal insufficiency caused by cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), probably due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To remove cryoglobulins and terminate the HCV infection, we utilized combination therapy with cryofiltration and interferon-α injection with corticosteroids. Interferon-α was capable of decreasing proteinuria but not diminishing cryoglobulin. Additional cryofiltration could remove cryoglobulin to an undetectable level. This combination therapy was partially successful to reduce proteinuria and prevent the progressive deterioration of renal function. The major adverse effects of this therapy were bleeding and myelosuppression. We conclude that this combination therapy may be effective and should be considered as treatment for cryoglobulinemic MPGN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-333
Number of pages5
JournalTherapeutic Apheresis
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Dec 17

Keywords

  • Cryofiltration
  • Cryoglobulin
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Interferon
  • Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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