The Driselase-treated fraction of rice bran is a more effective dietary factor to improve hypertension, glucose and lipid metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats compared to ferulic acid

Ardy Ardiansyah, Hiroshi Shirakawa, Takuya Koseki, Katsumi Hashizume, Michio Komai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with the Driselase-treated fraction (DF) of rice bran and ferulic acid (FA) on hypertension and glucose and lipid metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Male SHRSP at 4 weeks of age were divided into three groups, and for 8 weeks were fed (1) a control diet based on AIN-93M, (2) a DF of rice bran-supplemented diet at 60 g/kg and (3) an FA-supplemented diet at 0.01 g/kg. Means and standard errors were calculated and the data were tested by one-way ANOVA followed by a least significance difference test. The results showed that both the DF and FA diets significantly improved hypertension as well as glucose tolerance, plasma nitric oxide (NOx), urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and other parameters. In particular, compared to the FA diet, the DF diet produced a significant improvement in urinary NOx, hepatic triacylglycerol and several mRNA expressions of metabolic parameters involved in glucose and lipid metabolisms. The results of the metabolic syndrome-related parameters obtained from this study suggest that the DF diet is more effective than the FA diet.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-76
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Driselase fraction
  • Ferulic acid
  • Glucose metabolism
  • Lipid profile
  • Rice bran

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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