The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: Individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity

Kazuki Kimura, Satoshi Chiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20143063
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume282
Issue number1804
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 11

Keywords

  • Mate manipulation
  • Pulmonate land snails
  • Sexual conflict
  • Simultaneous hermaphrodites
  • Traumatic secretion transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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