The coexistence of TrkA with putative transmitter agents and calcium-binding proteins in the vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons of the adult rat

Hiroyuki Ichikawa, Cinda J. Helke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presence of the neurotrophin receptor, TrkA, in neurochemically identified vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons of the adult rat was examined. TrkA was colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), parvalbumin, or calbindin D-28k in neurons of the nodose, petrosal and/or jugular ganglia. In contrast, no TrkA-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in these ganglia colocalized tyrosine hydroxylase-ir. About one-half of the TrkA-ir neurons in the jugular and petrosal ganglia contained CGRP-ir, whereas only a few of the numerous TrkA-ir neurons in the nodose ganglion contained CGRP-ir. Although 43% of the TrkA-ir neurons in the nodose ganglion contained calbindin D-28k-ir, few or no TrkA-ir neurons in the petrosal or jugular ganglia were also labeled for either calcium-binding protein. These data show distinct colocalizations of TrkA with specific neurochemicals in vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons, and suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF), the neurotrophin ligand for TrkA, plays a role in functions of specific neurochemically defined subpopulations of mature vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-273
Number of pages6
JournalBrain research
Volume846
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Nov 6
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Calbindin D-28k
  • Calcitonin-gene related peptide
  • Jugular ganglion
  • Nodose ganglion
  • Parvalbumin
  • Petrosal ganglion
  • TrkA
  • Tyrosine hydroxylase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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