The benefit of chemotherapy in a patient with multiple brain metastases and meningitis carcinomatosa from ovarian cancer

Ayako Watanabe, Muneaki Shimada, Junzo Kigawa, Takahiro Iba, Tetsuro Oishi, Yasunobu Kanamori, Naoki Terakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on a 45-year-old patient with stage IIIc ovarian cancer, multiple brain metastases, and meningitis carcinomatosa. After three courses of initial chemotherapy, consisting of docetaxel and carboplatin, the patient underwent interval cytoreductive surgery, consisting of hyster-ectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, appendectomy, and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. Then five courses of the same chemotherapy were given as adjuvant treatment. At the completion of the primary therapy, she achieved a complete remission. Ten months after the completion of the initial treatment, multiple brain metastases with meningitis carcinomatosa were detected. After four courses of the same chemotherapy, she again had a complete response, confirmed by cranial enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and she felt well, with relief from the debilitating neurologic symptoms for 4 months. After this 4 months, her disease recurred, with meningitis carcinomatosa, and she requested supportive care only. She died 4 months after this recurrence. Chemotherapy can help to prolong life for some patients with multiple brain metastases and meningitis carcinomatosa from ovarian cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-71
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • Chemotherapy
  • Meningitis carcinomatosa
  • Ovarian cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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