The antimalarial drugs chloroquine and primaquine inhibit pyridoxal kinase, an essential enzyme for vitamin B6 production

Tomohiro Kimura, Ryutaro Shirakawa, Nobuhiro Yaoita, Takashi Hayashi, Keisuke Nagano, Hisanori Horiuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quinoline derivatives such as chloroquine and primaquine are widely used for the treatment of malaria. These drugs are also used for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, and more recently for cancer therapy. However, molecular target(s) of these drugs remain unclear. In this study, we have identified human pyridoxal kinase as a binding protein of primaquine. Primaquine inhibited pyridoxal kinases of malaria, trypanosome and human, while chloroquine inhibited only malaria pyridoxal kinase. Thus, we have identified pyridoxal kinase as a possible target molecule of the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and primaquine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3673-3676
Number of pages4
JournalFEBS Letters
Volume588
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 16

Keywords

  • Chloroquine
  • Malaria
  • Primaquine
  • Pyridoxal kinase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

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