The alanine/threonine polymorphism of the alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (SERPINA3) gene and ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Japanese population

Boris Krischek, Hiroyuki Akagawa, Atsushi Tajima, Akira Narita, Hidetoshi Kasuya, Tomokatsu Hori, Ituro Inoue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Serine protease inhibitor member 3 of clade A (SERPINA3), also known as alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, inhibits the activity of cathepsin G. The release of neutrophil cathepsin G (proteolytic enzyme) can destroy the vascular matrix through degradation, platelet aggregation and coagulation disorders. In a previous report there was evidence that an alanine/threonine polymorphism was associated with the risk factor for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a Polish population. We performed this study to determine whether this A15T polymorphism shows the same association in a Japanese population. Methods: A total of 437 patients with an aneurysmal SAH and 405 control cases of Japanese origin were genotyped for the A15T polymorphism and 2 further intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms by using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Results: In the patients with intracranial aneurysms the SERPINA3 A15T allele and genotype distribution did not differ significantly from the controls. Conclusion: In the Japanese population the A15T polymorphism of the SERPINA3 gene is not associated with aneurysmal SAH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-49
Number of pages4
JournalCerebrovascular Diseases
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan

Keywords

  • Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin
  • Aneurysm, intracranial
  • Polymorphism
  • SERPINA3
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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