The actin family member Arp6 and the histone variant H2A.Z are required for spatial positioning of chromatin in chicken cell nuclei

Eri Ohfuchi Maruyama, Tetsuya Hori, Hideyuki Tanabe, Hiroshi Kitamura, Ryo Matsuda, Shigenobu Tone, Pavel Hozak, Felix A. Habermann, Johann von Hase, Christoph Cremer, Tatsuo Fukagawa, Masahiko Harata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The spatial organization of chromatin in the nucleus contributes to genome function and is altered during the differentiation of normal and tumorigenic cells. Although nuclear actin-related proteins (Arps) have roles in the local alteration of chromatin structure, it is unclear whether they are involved in the spatial positioning of chromatin. In the interphase nucleus of vertebrate cells, gene-dense and gene-poor chromosome territories (CTs) are located in the center and periphery, respectively. We analyzed chicken DT40 cells in which Arp6 had been knocked out conditionally, and showed that the radial distribution of CTs was impaired in these knockout cells. Arp6 is an essential component of the SRCAP chromatin remodeling complex, which deposits the histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin. The redistribution of CTs was also observed in H2A.Z-deficient cells for gene-rich microchromosomes, but to lesser extent for gene-poor macrochromosomes. These results indicate that Arp6 and H2A.Z contribute to the radial distribution of CTs through different mechanisms. Microarray analysis suggested that the localization of chromatin to the nuclear periphery per se is insufficient for the repression of most genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3739-3743
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of cell science
Volume125
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug 15

Keywords

  • Actin-related protein
  • Chromosome territory
  • Gene expression
  • Histone variant
  • Nuclear organization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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