Tensile behavior and damage/acoustic emission characteristics of woven glass fiber reinforced/epoxy composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures

Yasuhide Shindo, F. Narita, K. Horiguchi, S. Takano, T. Takeda, K. Sanada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the tensile properties and damage behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) laminates at cryogenic temperatures. Cryogenic tensile tests were conducted on three types of woven-fabric laminate specimens, and information about the damage initiation and progression was provided by acoustic emission (AE) technique. A finite element model was also developed for progressive failure analyses of the three tensile test specimens, and applied to simulate the damage behavior in each specimen. A comparison was made between simulation and experiment.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationADVANCES IN CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING
Subtitle of host publicationTransactions of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, ICMC, Volume 52A
Pages249-256
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Mar 31
EventADVANCES IN CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING: Transactions of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, ICMC - Keystone, CO, United States
Duration: 2005 Aug 292005 Sep 2

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume824 I
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

OtherADVANCES IN CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING: Transactions of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, ICMC
CountryUnited States
CityKeystone, CO
Period05/8/2905/9/2

Keywords

  • Acoustic emission
  • Composite material
  • Cryomechanics
  • Failure
  • Finite element method
  • Material testing
  • Superconducting structures
  • Tensile properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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