Temporal effect of inertial cavitation with and without microbubbles on surface deformation of agarose S gel in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound

Y. Tomita, T. Matsuura, T. Kodama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sonoporation has the potential to deliver extraneous molecules into a target tissue non-invasively. There have been numerous investigations of cell membrane permeabilization induced by microbubbles, but very few studies have been carried out to investigate sonoporation by inertial cavitation, especially from a temporal perspective. In the present paper, we show the temporal variations in nano/micro-pit formations following the collapse of inertial cavitation bubbles, with and without Sonazoid® microbubbles. Using agarose S gel as a target material, erosion experiments were conducted in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound applied for various exposure times, Tex (0.002-60 s). Conventional microscopy was used to measure temporal variations in micrometer-scale pit numbers, and atomic force microscopy utilized to detect surface roughness on a nanometer scale. The results demonstrated that nanometer-scale erosion was predominantly caused by Sonazoid® microbubbles and C4F10 gas bubbles for 0.002 s < Tex < 1 s, while the number of micrometer-scale pits, caused mainly by inertial cavitation bubbles such as C4F10 gas bubbles and vapor bubbles, increased exponentially with increasing Tex in the range 0.1 s < Tex < 10 s. The results of the present study suggest that cavitation-induced sonoporation can produce various pore sizes in membranes, enabling the delivery of external molecules of differing sizes into cells or tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalUltrasonics
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Inertial cavitation
  • Microbubbles
  • Sonoporation
  • Surface roughness
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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