Targeting transcellular transport of α-synuclein for developing disease-modifying therapies for synucleinopathy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and it is characterized by progressive physical disability along with a variety of non-motor symptoms. Drugs that replenish dopamine can partly alleviate the motor symptoms; however, they do not cure the disease itself. Therefore, there is an urgent need for disease modifying therapies that would delay or prevent neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence suggests that α-synudein, a key molecule in PD, is secreted into the extracellular environment and can be transported from cell-to-cell, thereby affecting the physiological state of the neighboring cells in a prion-like manner. Given the potential role of extracellular α-synudein as the cause of disease progression, its prion-like propagation is a promising target for developing disease-modifying therapies for PD and other synudeinopathies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-556
Number of pages6
JournalBrain and Nerve
Volume70
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May

Keywords

  • Disease-modifying therapy
  • Multiple system atrophy
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Prion-like transmission
  • Synudeinopathy
  • α-synudein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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