Symptomatic hyperperfusion after superficial temporal artery - Middle cerebral artery anastomosis in a child with moyamoya disease

Miki Fujimura, Tomohiro Kaneta, Hiroaki Shimizu, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object: Surgical revascularization for moyamoya disease prevents cerebral ischemic attacks by improving cerebral blood flow (CBF). It is undetermined, however, how rapid increase in CBF affects ischemic brain at acute stage, especially in children. Case report: A 4-year-old girl with moyamoya disease underwent right superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. She suffered temporary left facial palsy 5 days after surgery. Postoperative N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography (23I-IMP-SPECT) revealed focal intense increase in CBF at the sites of anastomosis. Magnetic resonance imaging/angiography showed the apparently patent STA-MCA anastomosis as a thick high signal without ischemic changes. Her symptom improved 9 days after surgery, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) 2 months later showed normalization of CBF. Surgical revascularization completely relieved the transient ischemic attack on her left hand that was seen before surgery. Conclusion: We demonstrated, for the first time, that delayed focal neurological deficit after STA-MCA anastomosis can be caused by focal hyperperfusion in childhood moyamoya disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1198
Number of pages4
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct

Keywords

  • Hyperperfusion
  • Moyamoya disease
  • Single-photon emission computed tomography
  • Superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Symptomatic hyperperfusion after superficial temporal artery - Middle cerebral artery anastomosis in a child with moyamoya disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this