Study on fatigue mechanism of Mg-0.6at%Y alloy by cyclic tensile test

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this investigation, the fatigue mechanisms of Mg-0.6at%Y dilute alloy were studied by cyclic tensile tests. After annealing at 723 K for 8 h, average grain size of 180 pm was obtained. Yield stress and ultimate tensile strength were 65 and 140 MPa, respectively. Cyclic tensile tests were carried out at room temperature for 10 cycles. Stress was continuously cycled from nil to peak value and subsequently unloading back to nil. Peak stress was controlled according to yield stress: below yield stress, near yield stress and above yield stress. The results showed that basal slip and prismatic slip are the main fatigue mechanisms of Mg-Y alloy. {10-12} tension twinning only occurs when peak stress is above yield stress. Furthermore, compared with previous work on AZ31 Mg alloy, prismatic dislocation slip promotes cyclic strain hardening more obvious than {10-12} tension twinning does.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMagnesium Technology 2016 - Held During TMS 2016
Subtitle of host publication145th Annual Meeting and Exhibition
EditorsAlok Singh, Kiran Solanki, Michele Viola Manuel, Neale R. Neelameggham
PublisherMinerals, Metals and Materials Society
Pages299-303
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781119225805
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1
EventMagnesium Technology 2016 - TMS 2016: 145th Annual Meeting and Exhibition - Nashville, United States
Duration: 2016 Feb 142016 Feb 18

Publication series

NameMagnesium Technology
Volume2016-January
ISSN (Print)1545-4150

Other

OtherMagnesium Technology 2016 - TMS 2016: 145th Annual Meeting and Exhibition
CountryUnited States
CityNashville
Period16/2/1416/2/18

Keywords

  • Dislocation
  • Fatigue
  • Magnesium alloy
  • Twinning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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