Studies on respiratory infections in primary care clinic (IV). Antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from patients with respiratory infections visiting 21 private clinics in the Tohoku District of Japan

A. Watanabe, K. Ohizumi, M. Motomiya, K. Matsuno, T. Nishino, R. Sato, H. Hiraga, J. Hiraga, T. Kodama, K. Seki

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We determined the MICs of ampicillin, methicillin, cefaclor, cefixime, cefteram, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against a total of 1,448 strains from 11 species: 464 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, 306 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 114 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes, 37 strains of Branhamella catarrhalis, 329 strains of Haemophilus influenzae, 32 strains of Escherichia coli, 66 strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 26 strains of Enterobacter cloacae, 20 strains of Serratia marcescens, 12 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 42 strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, isolated from the throat swab and the sputum of 2,539 patients with respiratory infections who visited 21 private clinics in Tohoku district of Japan during the period from January to April in 1989. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were more active against S. aureus, B. catarrhalis, P. aeruginosa and A. calcoaceticus than other antibiotics. Ampicillin and cefteram were more active against S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes than other antibiotics. New-quinolones and cephems of new-generation were active against H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae and S. marcescens. Of 30 strains of S. aureus which were resistant (MIC greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml) to ampicillin, only one strain was resistant (MIC greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml) to methicillin. Twenty strains (6.5%) of S. pneumoniae and 49 strains (14.9%) of H. influenzae were resistant (MIC greater than or equal to 1.56 micrograms/ml) to ampicillin. Of 101 strains of H. influenzae of which their beta-lactamase activity was determined by Nitrocephin-method, 27 (26.7%) were beta-lactamase-positive strains. The above results indicated that MRSA is only rarely found in primary care clinics but the incidence of ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae in primary care clinics is almost the same as that of the intensive care clinic, i.e. medical school-affiliated hospitals. Therefore caution should be exercised as regards antibiotic resistance of the causative organism even in primary care clinics.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1220-1231
    Number of pages12
    JournalKansenshogaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases
    Volume64
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1990 Sep

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Studies on respiratory infections in primary care clinic (IV). Antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from patients with respiratory infections visiting 21 private clinics in the Tohoku District of Japan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this