Structure upgradation concept applied to cyclic mobility of sand and high ductility of natural clay

K. Nakai, M. Nakano, A. Asaoka, T. Kawai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The soil skeleton structure (structure, overconsolidation, and anisotropy) increases and decreases as the plastic deformation varies. Previously, only the structure has been considered to be degraded; however, observation of the undrained cyclic shear behavior of medium dense sand shows that not only does the structure degrade, but a structure upgradation process also occurs. Therefore, the concept of structure upgradation accompanying plastic swelling was introduced into the SYS Cam-clay model based on the results of testing. This structure upgradation concept makes it possible to describe the cyclic mobility of sand and to explain the high ductility behavior seen in soft natural clay.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationThe Academia and Practice of Geotechnical Engineering
Pages175-178
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event17th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ICSMGE 2009 - Alexandria, Egypt
Duration: 2009 Oct 52009 Oct 9

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 17th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering: The Academia and Practice of Geotechnical Engineering
Volume1

Other

Other17th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ICSMGE 2009
Country/TerritoryEgypt
CityAlexandria
Period09/10/509/10/9

Keywords

  • Cyclic mobility of sand
  • High ductility of natural clay
  • Structure upgradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

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