Strong temperature dependence of the first pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus at zero pressure

Yigang Zhang, Dapeng Zhao, Masanori Matsui, Guangjun Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The first pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus at zero pressure (K'0T) is a key equation of state (EOS) parameter. Its variation with temperature is poorly constrained and may influence the inference of composition and temperature of the deep Earth. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to derive the K'0T of MgO from 300 to 3000 K using directly the definition of K'0T and without relying on any EOS. The most important finding of the present study is that K'0T depends strongly on temperature. The cross derivative ∂ 2K0T/∂P∂T is found to be 5.1 ± 1.61 x 10-4 K-1 at 300 K, passing to 9.9 ± 2.7 x 10-4 K-1 at 1600 K, and reaches 15.1 ± 3.8 x 10-4 K-1 at 3000 K. The value at 300 K agrees with 3.9 ± 1.0 x 10-4 K-1 of Isaak (1993) within the uncertainty. The experimental adiabatic cross derivative of Chen et al. (1998), which is 2.7 ± 1.1 X 10-3 K-1 and often considered too high, is not far from our value of 1.1 ± 0.3 X 10-3 K-1 at 1600 K when the experimental and calculation uncertainties are considered. The obtained K0T are further compared with those from EOS fittings to infer the valid temperature domains of several commonly used EOSs. With this knowledge, the consistency of zero-pressure isothermal bulk modulus (K0T) from different experimental techniques (direct resonance measurements and fitting isothermal P-V data by an EOS) is demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberB11202
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth
Volume112
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Nov 4

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

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