Strain rate-temperature effect evaluation in the fractured steel bridge bent during earthquakes

H. Tamura, E. Sasaki, H. Yamada, H. Katsuchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

During the earthquakes of Northridge (USA, 1994) and Kobe (Japan, 1995), unexpected brittle fractures were observed in some steel structures. It was pointed out that high strain rate due to heavy magnitude of these earthquakes and temperature elevation during local plastic deformation might have affected the fracture behaviour. This paper addresses strain rate-temperature effects, as dynamic loading effect on materials, to estimate their effects at the fracture origin of steel bridge bents. The local strain rate change, temperature elevation, and their effects were studied with elastic-plastic FEM considering heat transfer. The strain rate and temperature histories were investigated assuming different combinations of ground accelerations and initial deflections of column flange plate. From the results, at the fracture origin of the bent, it was revealed that strain rate-temperature effects increases fracture toughness at the time of fracture. This conclusion indicates that there is a high possibility that brittle fracture in the bent was caused mainly by prestrain and stress multiaxiality.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual Conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering 2011, CSCE 2011
Pages687-696
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1
EventAnnual Conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering 2011, CSCE 2011 - Ottawa, ON, Canada
Duration: 2011 Jun 142011 Jun 17

Publication series

NameProceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering
Volume1

Other

OtherAnnual Conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering 2011, CSCE 2011
CountryCanada
CityOttawa, ON
Period11/6/1411/6/17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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