Spontaneously occurring mutations in the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase gene cause different sensitivities to ultraviolet-B in rice

Jun Hidema, Mika Teranishi, Yutaka Iwamatsu, Tokuhisa Hirouchi, Tadamasa Ueda, Tadashi Sato, Benjamin Burr, Betsy M. Sutherland, Kazuo Yamamoto, Tadashi Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sensitivity to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (280-320 nm) varies widely among rice cultivars. We previously indicated that UV-resistant rice cultivars are better able to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) through photorepair than are UV-sensitive cultivars. In this paper, we report that UVB sensitivity in rice, in part, is the result of defective CPD photolyase alleles. Surjamkhi (indica) exhibited greater sensitivity to UVB radiation and was more deficient in CPD photorepair ability compared with UV-resistant Sasanishiki (japonica). The deficiency in CPD photorepair in Surjamkhi resulted from changes in two nucleotides at positions 377 and 888 in the photolyase gene, causing alterations of two deduced amino acids at positions 126 and 296 in the photolyase enzyme. A linkage analysis in populations derived from Surjamkhi and Sasanishiki showed that UVB sensitivity is a quantitative inherited trait and that the CPD photolyase locus is tightly linked with a quantitative trait locus that explains a major portion of the genetic variation for this trait. These results suggest that spontaneously occurring mutations in the CPD photolyase gene cause different degrees of sensitivity to UVB in rice, and that the resistance of rice to UVB radiation could be increased by increasing the photolyase function through conventional breeding or bioengineering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-67
Number of pages11
JournalPlant Journal
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jul

Keywords

  • Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer
  • Gene mutation
  • Oryza sativa
  • Photolyase
  • Photorepair
  • UVB sensitivity
  • Ultraviolet-B

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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