Specific interactions between human norovirus and environmental matrices: Effects on the virus ecology

Mohan Amarasiri, Daisuke Sano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human norovirus is the major cause of non-bacterial epidemic gastroenteritis. Human norovirus binds to environmental solids via specific and non-specific interactions, and several specific receptors for human norovirus have been reported. Among them, histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) are the most studied specific receptor. Studies have identified the presence of HBGA-like substances in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of human enteric bacteria present in aquatic environments, gastrointestinal cells, gills, and palps of shellfish, and cell walls, leaves, and veins of lettuce. These HBGA-like substances also interact with human norovirus in a genotype-dependent manner. Specific interactions between human norovirus and environmental matrices can affect norovirus removal, infectivity, inactivation, persistence, and circulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge and future directions related to the specific interactions between human norovirus and HBGA-like substances in environmental matrices and their possible effects on the fate and circulation of human norovirus.

Original languageEnglish
Article number224
JournalViruses
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar

Keywords

  • Enterobacter
  • Histo-blood group antigens
  • Human norovirus
  • Specific interactions
  • Wastewater

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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