Specific binding of a 14-3-3 protein to autophosphorylated WPK4, an SNF1-related wheat protein kinase, and to WPK4-phosphorylated nitrate reductase

Y. Ikeda, N. Koizumi, T. Kusano, H. Sano

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    69 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    WPK4 is a wheat protein kinase related to the yeast protein kinase SNF1, which plays a role in catabolite repression. To identify proteins involved in signal transduction through WPK4, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and isolated two cDNA clones designated as TaWIN1 and TaWIN2. Both encode 14-3-3 proteins that, upon autophosphorylation, bind the C-terminal regulatory domain of WPK4. Mutational analysis through amino acid substitution revealed that TaWIN1 and TaWIN2 primarily bind WPK4 through phosphoserines at the positions 388 and 418, both located in the C-terminal region. Mutations in the conserved residues of the TaWIN1 amphipathic groove impaired the ability of TaWIN1 to bind to WPH4. A screen for in vitro phosphorylation of proteins involved in nutrient metabolism revealed a putative WPK4 substrate, nitrate reductase; its hinge 1 region was efficiently phosphorylated by WPK4. Subsequent far Western blots showed that it specifically bound TaWIN1. Since nitrate reductase has been shown to be inactivated by phosphorylation upon 14-3-3 binding, the present findings strongly suggest that WPK4 is the protein kinase responsible for controlling the nitrogen metabolic pathway, assembling the nitrate reductase and 14-3-3 complex through its phosphorylation specificity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)31695-31700
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
    Volume275
    Issue number41
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2000 Oct 13

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry
    • Molecular Biology
    • Cell Biology

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Specific binding of a 14-3-3 protein to autophosphorylated WPK4, an SNF1-related wheat protein kinase, and to WPK4-phosphorylated nitrate reductase'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this