Spatiotemporal balance in competing apparent motion is not predicted from the strength of the single-motion percept

Kazuhiro Sakamoto, Takayuki Sugiura, Toshihiko Kaku, Toru Onizawa, Masafumi Yano

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Apparent motion is useful for investigating how spatiotemporal cues are integrated to determine the identity of a moving object. To examine its spatiotemporal properties, a competingmotion paradigm has advantages in strict psychophysical evaluation, despite difficulty in object-identity determination, over a non-competing subjective-grading paradigm. The latter has been often used, whereas the former has not been fully investigated. Here, we compared these two paradigms. In the competing-motion experiment, a sample spot was followed by a far and a near test spot with onset asynchrony. We found that the onset asynchrony between the near and far test spots was directly related to the distance ratio between them. This spatial size-invariant relation was not predicted from the strength of the single-apparent-motion percept, estimated from the non-competing subjective-grading experiment in which a sample spot was followed by only one test spot. Moreover, the spatiotemporal balance in competing apparent motion was found not to be valid under negative interstimulus-interval conditions, although a single apparent motion is perceived in those conditions. These clear discrepancies suggest that competing and single apparent motions are processed in a different way according to the difficulty in object identification.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)947-957
    Number of pages11
    JournalPerception
    Volume35
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006 Sep 13

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Ophthalmology
    • Sensory Systems
    • Artificial Intelligence

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