Spatial intertidal distribution of bivalves and polychaetes in relation to environmental conditions in the Natori River estuary, Japan

Takeshi Tomiyama, Nobuhiro Komizunai, Tatsuya Shirase, Kinuko Ito, Michio Omori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper aims to reveal spatial variation in the abundance of infaunal bivalves and polychaetes at different spatial scales (station: 200-800 m intervals; plot: 5-20 m), and to reveal environmental variables affecting the spatial distribution of animals in the Natori River estuary, Japan. We found six bivalve species and eight polychaete species from 52 plots at 12 stations. Nuttallia olivacea and Heteromastus sp. were found to be the most abundant species of bivalves and polychaetes, respectively. Assemblage patterns of bivalves and polychaetes were classified into five distinct groups. Substrata (silt-clay contents), salinity, and relative elevation were the variables found to affect the infaunal assemblage patterns. Chlorophyll a was not a significant variable, but benthic animals were absent at sites with extremely low chlorophyll a conditions. Macrobenthic assemblage patterns were different not only between stations but often differed between plots at the same station, reflecting the complex assemblage structure of benthic invertebrates. Detailing such animal-environment relationship is essential in understanding the potential food supply for estuarine fishes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-250
Number of pages8
JournalEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Nov 10

Keywords

  • Natori River estuary
  • Sendai Bay
  • benthic assemblage
  • environmental conditions
  • estuaries
  • multivariate analysis
  • tidal flats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science

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