Sound velocity measurements in liquid Fe-S at high pressure: Implications for Earth's and lunar cores

Keisuke Nishida, Yoshio Kono, Hidenori Terasaki, Suguru Takahashi, Miho Ishii, Yuta Shimoyama, Yuji Higo, Ken Ichi Funakoshi, Tetsuo Irifune, Eiji Otani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The P-wave velocity (VP) of liquid Fe57S43 was measured up to 5.4GPa using an ultrasonic method combined with the synchrotron X-ray technique. The VP of liquid Fe57S43 showed little change with temperature, but increased almost linearly from 3105±11m/s to 3845±9m/s with increasing pressure from 2.4 to 5.4GPa. This can be approximated by VP [m/s]=2664+205.4×P, where P is the pressure in GPa. The VP of liquid Fe57S43 at 2.4-5.4GPa was significantly lower than that of pure liquid Fe. However, the pressure dependence of VP of the liquid Fe57S43 was markedly higher than that of pure liquid Fe. The marked difference in the pressure dependences of VP between pure liquid Fe and liquid Fe57S43 may cause VP crossover at around 7GPa. As a result, the VP of liquid Fe57S43 would become higher than that of pure liquid Fe at pressures higher than 7GPa. Thus, S decreases VP at low pressures such as those of the lunar outer core, but would increase it at the high pressures of the Earth's outer core. Assuming the lunar core consists of a liquid Fe-FeS outer core and a solid Fe inner core, the expected VP in the lunar outer core ranges from 3756 to 4230m/s.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-186
Number of pages5
JournalEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume362
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 5

Keywords

  • Core
  • Fe-S
  • High pressure
  • Liquid
  • Sound velocity
  • Ultrasonic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

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