Solubility of HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, butane, and isobutane in low-density polyethylene at temperatures from 383.15 to 473.15 K and at pressures up to 3.4 MPa

Ming Wang, Yoshiyuki Sato, Toru Iketani, Shigeki Takishima, Hirokatsu Masuoka, Taku Watanabe, Yoshihito Fukasawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The solubility of HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, butane and isobutane in molten low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been measured with a volumetric method at pressures up to 3.4 MPa and at temperatures of 383.15, 413.15, 443.15, and 473.15 K. The solubility increased with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. The measured solubility was correlated with the Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state (S-L EOS) and a temperature-dependent binary interaction parameter. In all cases, the calculated solubility was in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data to within an average absolute deviation of 3.0, 5.1, 7.2, and 3.5% for HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, butane and isobutane, respectively. The Henry's constants, Kp, for butane and isobutane obtained in this work were in good agreement with the literature data and Stiel's equation. A correlation for 1/Kp of fluorocarbons in LDPE was developed in terms of fluorocarbon critical compressibility factor. Average absolute deviations for the correlated 1/Kp were 2.7, 8.1, 1.3, 4.7, and 5.2% for CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HCFC-142b, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalFluid Phase Equilibria
Volume232
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 May 25

Keywords

  • Data and correlation
  • Equation of state
  • Fluorocarbon
  • Henry's constant
  • Polyethylene
  • Solubility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Solubility of HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, butane, and isobutane in low-density polyethylene at temperatures from 383.15 to 473.15 K and at pressures up to 3.4 MPa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this