Serial analysis of gene expression in methamphetamine- and phencyclidine-treated rodent cerebral cortices: Are there common mechanisms?

Yuta Ouchi, Yasuhiko Kubota, Chihiro Ito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pharmacological actions of methamphetamine (METH) and phencyclidine (PCP) are different, but both of them can induce similar psychiatric disorders including abuse, intoxication, withdrawal, and psychotic symptoms like those of schizophrenia. These mental disorders are caused not only by their direct pharmacological effects, bat also by secondary brain damage containing gene expression changes. In order to broadly grasp these alterations, we used serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a transcriptome analysis. We analyzed three cDNA libraries from cerebral cortices of saline (1 mL/kg)-, METH (4 mg/kg)-, or PCP (10 mg/ltg)-treated Wistar rats (one hour after i.p. administration). The numbers of total tags were about 50,000 in each library, and approximately 18,000 kinds of tags were identified respectively. From the comparisons of three groups, we found both METH- and PCP-reactive genes. Upregulated genes contained caimodulin 2, stromal cell-derived factor receptor 1, brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 2, ras homologue enriched in brain, basigin and thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor. Downregulated genes contained lipocalin 2, aldolase A, importin 13, fatty acid binding protein 3, and glycine receptor α2 subunit These data suggest important clues of common molecular basis in METH- and PCP-related psychiatric disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-61
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1025
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Cerebral cortex
  • Methamphetamine
  • Phencyclidine
  • Rat
  • Schizophrenia
  • Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)
  • Substance-related disorders
  • Transcriptome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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