Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of major congenital anomalies for pregnancies in Japan: A nationwide birth cohort study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study

Japan Environment & Children's Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyzed data from the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS), on the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) use during pregnancy and the risk of developing of major congenital anomalies in Japan. JECS is an ongoing nationwide birth cohort study. The study includes 95 994 single pregnant women and their offspring. Among them, 172 used any SSRI up to the 12th gestational week. Crude analyses show a significantly increased incidence of upper limb, abdominal, and urogenital abnormalities. In particular, the incidence of microcephaly, hydrencephalus, esophageal atresia, small intestinal atresia, and achondroplasia was significantly higher with than without exposure to these substances. On multivariate analyses, urogenital abnormality was significant (odds ratio 3.227; 95% confidence interval: 1.460–7.134). This Japanese nationwide birth cohort survey clarified that the use of any SSRI until the 12th gestational week was associated with urogenital abnormality in children. The survey for association with minor classification abnormality needs further examination in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-78
Number of pages7
JournalCongenital Anomalies
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May

Keywords

  • Japan Environment and Children's Study
  • major congenital anomalies
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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