Selective accumulation of PpIX and photodynamic effect after aminolevulinic acid treatment of human adenomyosis xenografts in nude mice

Haruka Suzuki-Kakisaka, Takashi Murakami, Toru Hirano, Yukihiro Terada, Nobuo Yaegashi, Kunihiro Okamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on human adenomyosis xenografts in a mouse model. Design: Human adenomyosis tissues were implanted SC into nude mice. We measured 5-aminolevulinic acid pharmacokinetics in these mice by analyzing tissue sections 1 to 6 hours after intraperitoneal administration. Twenty-four hours after photodynamic therapy, we evaluated tissue morphologic features. Setting: Department of obstetrics and gynecology at a university hospital in Japan. Patient(s): Immunodeficient mice. Tissue grafts were taken from women with adenomyosis attending a university hospital. Intervention(s): Photodynamic treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s): Peak fluorescence after intraperitoneal ALA administration and tissue histological changes 24 hours after photodynamic therapy. Result(s): Peak fluorescence was observed 3 hours after intraperitoneal administration. Histological studies revealed decreased numbers of epithelial and stromal cells in adenomyosis models after therapy. Conclusion(s): Photodynamic therapy with ALA caused extensive cell death in human adenomyosis tissues implanted into nude mice. Photodynamic treatment using ALA is a potential treatment for patients with adenomyosis uteri.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1523-1527
Number of pages5
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume90
Issue number4 SUPPL.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct

Keywords

  • 5-aminoleuvulinic acid
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • adenomyosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Selective accumulation of PpIX and photodynamic effect after aminolevulinic acid treatment of human adenomyosis xenografts in nude mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this