Seawater Inundation from the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Continues to Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Communities 1 Year Later

Ryoki Asano, Yutaka Nakai, Wataru Kawada, Yoichiro Shimura, Tamio Inamoto, Jun Fukushima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of inundation caused by the 2011 Tohoku tsunami on soil bacterial communities in agricultural fields were evaluated. Bacterial communities were compared across three different types of soil, unflooded field (UF) soil, soil flooded for 2 weeks (short term (ST)), and soil flooded for 2 months (long term (LT)), using polymerase chain reaction-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Acidobacteria were dominant in UF, with a relative abundance of approximately 35 %, and Proteobacteria dominated flooded soils (30-67 %). Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that the community structure of soil bacteria in flooded soils (ST and LT) clearly differed from that in UF. Differences between LT and ST fields were rarely observed in terms of chemical properties and microbial community structure at the phylum level. However, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in LT tended to occur at high and low abundances, respectively. Halothiobacillus, a halotolerant SOB, was detected in all LT fields. Unexpectedly, a zeta-Proteobacteria, which had previously only been detected in marine environments, was detected in LT fields only. Our results demonstrate that the effects of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami on soil bacterial communities in agricultural fields may have lasted at least 1 year. Furthermore, SOB, NOB, and zeta-Proteobacteria may serve as indicators of the effects of seawater inundation on microorganisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)639-646
Number of pages8
JournalMicrobial Ecology
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Soil Science

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