Runx2 determines bone maturity and turnover rate in postnatal bone development and is involved in bone loss in estrogen deficiency

Zenjiro Maruyama, Carolina A. Yoshida, Tatsuya Furuichi, Norio Amizuka, Masako Ito, Ryo Fukuyama, Toshihiro Miyazaki, Hideki Kitaura, Kouhei Nakamura, Takashi Fujita, Naoko Kanatani, Takeshi Moriishi, Kei Yamana, Wenguang Liu, Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Kozo Nakamura, Toshihisa Komori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Runx2 is an essential transcription factor for osteoblast differentiation. However, the functions of Runx2 in postnatal bone development remain to be clarified. Introduction of dominant-negative (dn)-Runx2 did not inhibit Col1a1 and osteocalcin expression in mature osteoblastic cells. In transgenic mice that expressed dn-Runx2 in osteoblasts, the trabecular bone had increased mineralization, increased volume, and features of compact bone, and the expression of major bone matrix protein genes was relatively maintained. After ovariectomy, neither osteolysis nor bone formation was enhanced and bone was relatively conserved. In wild-type mice, Runx2 was strongly expressed in immature osteoblasts but downregulated during osteoblast maturation. These findings indicate that the maturity and turnover rate of bone are determined by the level of functional Runx2 and Runx2 is responsible for bone loss in estrogen deficiency, but that Runx2 is not essential for maintenance of the expression of major bone matrix protein genes in postnatal bone development and maintenance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1876-1890
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental Dynamics
Volume236
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Bone metabolism
  • Osteoblast
  • Osteoclast
  • Osteocyte
  • Runx2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

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